L.A. Gente (L.A. People)

Featuring: Pablo Unzueta

In Los Angeles, street vending food is at the center of political marginalization, while also bridging together lives, as told through its vendors and the food that attracts the hungry into these small pockets of smoke-filled street corners and alleyways.

ARTIST BIO

My name is Pablo Unzueta, born on July 22, 1994 in Van Nuys, California. I have been fortunate enough to be immersed in the perspectives of my father and grandmother’s visual work.

My father, Luis Hidalgo, is an Associated Press photographer based in Santiago, Chile, who has focused on the impact and aftermath of dictatorship. My grandmother, Amanda Unzueta worked tirelessly in documenting Latino minorities in her own North Los Angeles, California neighborhood.

Through their photography and storytelling, I have been able to experience life in two very distinct parts of the world.

In my photography I focus mainly on long-term projects that center around social issues such as economic inequality, xenophobia, addiction, injustice, and daily life. I believe photography can honor people’s stories despite their difficult circumstances.

I’m currently based in Los Angeles, California and will receive my Associate in Arts degree in journalism and sociology from Mt. San Antonio College. I will continue my studies and transfer to a university and work towards my bachelor’s degree.

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PROGRAMMING

OTHER OUTDOOR EXHIBITIONS ]

Living in Sanctuary

Featuring: Cinthya Santos Briones

A long-term project documenting individuals living in sanctuary across the US––the last alternative for keeping families together while they fight for a suspension of deportation.

Underground Chefs of South Central

Featuring: Oriana Koren

Interested in the intersection of race, class, and food, Underground Chefs of South Central is an exploration of black culinary creativity and ingenuity.

DRIVE-THRU

Featuring: Lara Jo Regan

Lara Jo Regan’s large-scale environmental installation takes the viewer on an noirish spin, disrupting our perspective of minimum wage workers and the fast-food experience.

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